Pizza Pi

We ate in Pi yesterday. I read a review ages ago in The Irish Times which gave it a huge thumbs up but we hadn’t had a chance to go. It’s probably some of the nicest pizza we’ve ever eaten. I’m sorry it took to long to visit but we’ll be back.

We had tomato, veggie and ham and rocket pizzas and the winner hands down was the veggie one. I’m going to try to recreate some of the flavours at home (every week I buy a butternut squash because it’s never in plastic in Lidl and every week I wonder what to do with it and end up making soup) but I know I won’t come close to the taste.

The only downside was that we couldn’t have coffee after the pizza. Not a massive hardship, but if they did coffee like they do pizzas I think they’d be on to a winner.

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Pizza Pi

The Life Changing Magic of Finding People You Didn’t Know Existed

davI had no idea there were people Just Like Me who enjoyed reading their favourite children’s books written decades ago.  On a whim, while on maternity leave with my first child, I looked up Chalet School on Facebook and found not one but three groups dedicated to people Just Like Me.

I’ve bought and sold books, I’ve had heated conversations about important subjects such as Order Marks and how to pronounce Evadne and I’ve been delighted to see life updates from virtual friends.

I still adore these books and the groups and I still feel enormous reassurance that my love of schools stories first published in the 1920s is perfectly normal. I’ve nearly completed my collection of unabridged stories, including some particularly treasured hardbacks and a first edition of the first Chalet School book I ever read.

Today I sent some of my duplicates off to new homes. I’m not making a lot from the sale and I don’t really care because it sparks a lot of joy to send well loved books off to new homes, safe in the knowledge they’re going to like minded people.

The Life Changing Magic of Finding People You Didn’t Know Existed

Tiny Sparks of Joy

oznorThe two new lamps above, which I bought last week but moved around a lot this week. I think the spots they’re in work well for now. I’ve been looking for new lamps for ages and these ones were on sale at the right price.

Finally getting around to listening to This American Life. I’ve been listening to a lot of podcasts lately and this one definitely sparks joy.

Finding my junior cert results when sorting through a pile of stuff I was certain had only the essentials and things which sparked joy. The pile falls into the sentimental category of stuff for the KonMari method. I need to come back to it.

My local library, yet again. Two books I expected to wait months for arrived in this week.

Using up stuff that’s been in our food cupboards for too long. Empty containers are very satisfying.

Tiny Sparks of Joy

Home Work

davThis is a very boring picture but it shows something about which I am very excited. Almost three years after we moved into this house, we have hooks on the back of our bathroom and bedroom doors. I can now hang my dressing gown up between showers. I was somewhat inspired by this post on the satisfaction which can be derived from teeny tiny improvements to your home. A few other small jobs have been crossed off my to-do list this week.

I’m not really a believer in things balancing out but as we put up these hooks and patted ourselves on the back, a second set of hooks came away from the wall. That’s on the to-do list for this weekend, as we’re very partial to being able to hang our coats in one spot rather than cluttering up the end of the stairs.

Home Work

21 Years Ago, I Was A Young Scientist

When I was 16 and in transition year in school, I was in the Young Scientist exhibition, along with some friends from school, one of whom is still a dear friend today and works in science. My project was on antibacterial detergents and I have no idea why I plumped on this idea for my submission.

It was a fantastic experience. I don’t work in science but I do love science and I still love the idea of a young scientist exhibition. To be quite honest, the memories of the social side of those few days stayed with me much more than the science side and for a socially inept 16 year old that was probably a good thing.

I have such fond feelings about that time in my life. Every year when the exhibition pops up in the same hall where my project was showcased all those years ago I get a smile on my face thinking back to when some of the greatest thrills of my life were seeing my project title on the little stand I had been allocated and winning tickets to go and see Blur in the Point Depot.

I’m really looking forward to bringing my own children to this when they’re a wee bit older, and maybe seeing their projects exhibited when they’re older again. I’m sure this year’s submissions have much fancier graphics (shout out to Windows 95!) and the students are a lot more tech savvy (no boosting your social media profile back in 1998 but I hope they have as much fun as I did and look back fondly on 2019 as I do on that January in 1998 when I was 16 and having the time of my life.

 

21 Years Ago, I Was A Young Scientist

Resolutions

Definitely cliché, but I’m hoping writing them down will help.

  • Go to the gym three times a week. I’m starting with a personal trainer session tomorrow afternoon.
  • Write things on the calendar so I’m not constantly wondering if I’m missing something. This one is going pretty well so far.
  • Continue to leave my phone upstairs every evening. I enjoy TV and chats so much more without the constant scrolling.
  • Use the library a lot more. I love our local library and it sparks joy every time I visit.
  • Eat vegetarian at least once a week. December was a Month of Meat.

 

 

Resolutions